Uncertainty

The very advanced and technologically advanced modern society we have to live in is full of paradoxes that we normally pay little or no attention to. The important thing is that we feel safe with the protections we can produce so that our lives are full of blessings.

If we go shopping, we make sure that what we buy is absolutely guaranteed, because it has had to pass numerous quality checks.

Whenever we buy a perishable product, we can instantly check the expiration date, origin, packaging date and take it to our mouth with peace of mind knowing that we will not die from poisoning. This high reliability in the regulatory system provides the security that makes us very vulnerable when we have to make decisions for ourselves.

If the product is out of date, we throw it away without further ado as it’s probably in a perfect consumable condition, but we don’t realize it could be in bad shape when it’s in the margins because we doubt it, not for a moment, that’s a possibility.

The paradox arises when something in the system fails and a sad cucumber is turned into a serial killer at the behest of the government. Two news stories followed by three statements cause a catastrophe in and around the cucumber world, forcing hundreds of tons of innocent, bright and delicious cucumbers to be thrown away.

By generalizing and following a new psychological principle I just introduced as “evoked uncertainty,” we conclude that we cannot trust the system and that whatever cucumber can do is subject to reasonable suspicion. decided to condemn tomatoes, eggplants, lettuce, berries, legumes, but no one and nothing warned us about the possible risks to our health from these foods.

The principle of induced uncertainty, where it has more influence, is in health matters. In Spanish healthcare, the resulting uncertainty is directly proportional to where our disease process is treated and the doctor responsible for doing it.

In such an advanced society, chilling paradoxes still exist, such as scheduling a cancer patient for a month after a routine checkup and forcing him to call the day after making the appointment and talk to his doctor three days later. After three painful waits imagining his death, the doctor informs him that everything is going well.

Source: Informacion

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